you need to create some time to experiment

Evidence is a really useful way of looking at communications. But if we don't leave space fr creativity and experiments we risk misunderstanding how to use growing and emerging digital tools and platforms.

by Dan Slee

There's been a real drive for evidence based campaigns in the public sector just recently.

Government communicators have been asked not to do anything unless it's based on data.

The argument goes that this cuts out the vanity campaign or the SOS - the Sending Out Stuff - that sees press releases and other things shovelled out the door because some action is better than nothing.

Don't get me wrong, I can see real merit in having a get out of jail free card when faced with a senior request 'for stuff.'

But I'm starting to think about if we need to create some space for experimentation. Things like Trojan mice. These are things that see you try something out low budget just to see if it works and you can learn from.

One example of this skunkwork lab is the excellent Torfaen Council Elvis gritter YouTube that's been around for a while. If you haven't seen it, it's the low budget Elvis impersonator from the Valleys singing about how the council can't be everywhere and not to panic buy bread. It's brilliant.  It was done on a shoestring to make people smile, to tell them some important things and done entirely without research.

It works because it's human and is entirely without strategy.

I was helping train a local government comms team last week when this clip came up and we showed it just to see the reaction. There was disbelief. Then laughter. Then real affection. It works. It just works. I rememberdiscussing it 12-months ag with someone who works for an authority who ruthlessly apply the research-led ROSIE logic. 

"It's really, really good and I love it," she said. "But of couse we could never do it where I work."

So how do you create the space needed to make the Trojan mice flourish?

Google famously give staff a day a week to work on their own projects. Some of those projects have become key to their future strategy.

Tectonic plates in the world of communications are shifting. The centre cannot hold. Different channels are emerging and with them the demand for new skills. If you want the evidence, more than 70 per cent in our survey four months ago said the job was getting harder.

So, the task facing the the comms leader is how to create some safe space to experiment. 

And if you are a comms person in the trenches, how are you going to carve out some Google time for yourself to look after your future?

Dan Slee is co-founder of comms2point0.

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